I'm a herpetologist by training but a naturalist at heart. My masters thesis is looking into the Panamint alligator lizard, Elgaria panamintina. In particular I'm focusing on identifying its range and testing out a variety of novel techniques which may benefit the field of herpetology as a whole. I post things that interest me and often post updates on what I'm doing in the vertebrate museum, in the field, or in the lab.

 

FOLLOW ALL THE SCIENCE BLOGS! Masterpost: Part 2

markscherz:

sweetteascience:

shychemist:

[Updated 02/14/2014]

Hello everyone. This has been a little project of mine over the past few days 

I hope you all enjoy this listing, and share it around. Share all the science. :3

Disclaimer:

I will be editing this from time to time and I’ll keep a link to it on my blog so you can find it easily.

This is not meant to be a list of all science blogs on tumblr. Only all the ones I follow (which is still a lot but definitely not all). The blogs listed are all active as well (within the past few weeks).

If you are not on the list and want me to check out your blog, send me a message. I may or may not follow you

I categorized each blog by scientific field: 

Anthropology, Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Engineering/Technology, Environmental Science, General Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Medical, Paleontology, Physics and Zoology

The first post got too big, and I’ve had to split it into two posts.

Post #1 Contains the fields of Anthropology, Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Engineering/Technology and Environmental Science.

This post contains General Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Medical, Paleontology, Physics and Zoology.

If you’re not happy with the section I put you in, send me a message and I’ll make an edit. I had to make quick decisions on hundreds of blogs, I’m only human.

Its a LONG post, so it might be easier to just search for the field you’re interested in.

With that said, enjoy!

Read More

Guys, the masterlist of STEM tumblr blogs is now split into TWO posts. That’s right we are officially too much awesome for Tumblr to handle all at once! Part one is the original post so it still has 2000+ notes, but Part TWO (this post) is a fresh little baby post so let’s make sure we get it circulating around just as much! 

THIS IS HIGHLY IMPORTANT.

Lots of good science-related blogs to follow on this list.

sushiandpie:

if youre down or sad tonight, watch this seal complain about going into the water and in general be a big baby

This is an adorable Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) from Antarctica who is part of an ecological study, you can learn more about the study here.

(Source: pissyeti)

Join PARC!

I successfully convinced a herp rescue owner to join PARC (Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation) today… hopefully I can convince you to join too!

Become a member of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation!

PARC depends upon the help and support from its volunteer members. PARC’s membership involves all individuals, organizations, and agencies with an interest in amphibian and reptile conservation. Our members represent many different sectors including federal agencies, state agencies, nongovernmental organizations, universities, and industry. We encourage you to attend Regional and National PARC meetings and learn about the issues affecting herp conservation issues in your area.

Why join?

Membership in PARC is completely free. As a member you will be helping to join a network of professionals and others who are interested in reversing the decline of amphibians and reptiles across the country You will receive a quarterly PARC e-newsletter, have access to read and post messages on our national and regional listserve, and be kept up-to-date on important issues affecting herps nationwide.

What they fail to mention (and is really a fringe benefit of joining) is the amazing field trips associated with the meetings- I got not just one lifer, but a handful on my latest PARC meeting field trip… gila monster x3, desert tortoises, tiger rattler, arizona coral snake and more because we had after hours access to a conservation area.  Plus, you get to talk with the professionals in the field- its a great way to learn more about what professional herpetologists do/make connections (they’re all super nice).

Hobbyist? Student? Professional? Person just interested in herps/science? JOIN!

Did I mention its free? and the conferences are pretty cheap? because they are.

I’d really like to know how many people I convince to join/get involved… so let me know if you do :)

Majors That Will Get You Into the 1%

Undergraduate Degree   Total   (% Who Are 1 %)   (Share of All 1 %)

Zoology                     159,935            6.9%                    0.6%

Clearly those must be vets… or… top level animal planet people (or maybe really rich professors?) because:

the average salary of a wildlife biologist: $63000.

the average salary of a game warden: $54,950 

These two are the two of the main career paths for a zoology degree (just about all zoology degrees end up working for the federal government or at a consulting group (which does pay a little better))


Or maybe we’re just really good at saving up our money and not spending it on fancy cars and stuff?

Speed painting (~1hr drawing time) of a Falcated Duck (Anas falcata).
I’ve always used sketches to help me identify animals… I think I’ll do speed paintings to learn my sparrows, gulls, and other small birds that are hard to identify. 
Falcated ducks are native to Asia, however over the last month or so a rare visitor to California has birders from across the state flocking to try to see the rare bird. Luckily he seems unphased by people and chose to hang out in a pond right adjacent to a viewing station.  He eluded me for this year, but next time I go out I’m going to actually stay until I find him!

Speed painting (~1hr drawing time) of a Falcated Duck (Anas falcata).

I’ve always used sketches to help me identify animals… I think I’ll do speed paintings to learn my sparrows, gulls, and other small birds that are hard to identify. 

Falcated ducks are native to Asia, however over the last month or so a rare visitor to California has birders from across the state flocking to try to see the rare bird. Luckily he seems unphased by people and chose to hang out in a pond right adjacent to a viewing station.  He eluded me for this year, but next time I go out I’m going to actually stay until I find him!

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ScienceDaily (Dec. 19, 2011) — In June 2011, a team of Chinese and Swedish researchers rediscovered the breeding area for the poorly known Blackthroat Luscinia obscura, in the Qinling mountains, Shaanxi province, north central China.

"The song is distinctive, and consists of rather short, quick, varied strophes that include both whistles and harsh notes. The strophes are delivered at a fairly slow, even pace. Several individuals were sound recorded in 2011, and two of these recordings are now made freely available. This will facilitate future surveys of this enigmatic bird species."

Read more at Science Daily.

14-billion-years-later:

Dyeing fish and making them transparent seems to be all the rage these days. So here’s a cool picture of a frog that’s undergone the same treatment. The treatment itself consists of staining bones and cartilage and then using enzymes to render the actual flesh transparent but not actually removing it.

While curating the fish collection today we found two jars of fish done up in this style… its amazing and I want to know more about it!

14-billion-years-later:

Dyeing fish and making them transparent seems to be all the rage these days. So here’s a cool picture of a frog that’s undergone the same treatment. The treatment itself consists of staining bones and cartilage and then using enzymes to render the actual flesh transparent but not actually removing it.

While curating the fish collection today we found two jars of fish done up in this style… its amazing and I want to know more about it!

California Alligator Lizard (Elgaria multicarinata multicarinata) (by Crotalinae)
Quail Ridge UC Reserve, California
(another in hand shot, sorry… didn’t get any better shot of him)

California Alligator Lizard (Elgaria multicarinata multicarinata) (by Crotalinae)

Quail Ridge UC Reserve, California

(another in hand shot, sorry… didn’t get any better shot of him)

Pacific Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus amabilis) (by Crotalinae)
Normally I avoid “in-hand” shots of field herping, but I love how this one turned out.

Pacific Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus amabilis) (by Crotalinae)

Normally I avoid “in-hand” shots of field herping, but I love how this one turned out.

I’m headed out to go check on 36 hanging nest boxes… hopefully its not super windy or picking them out of the trees will be miserable. I will however remember to bring my camera so I can take some pictures of what is inside the boxes.

and this.
I almost always forget the common name, and further confuse people by using the short hand of binomial names… (ie Trach=Trachemys scripta=evil pest in the arboretum, Marm=Emys marmorata= awesome turtle in the arboretum, Crot=best snakes ever, Zonata= snake that I absolutely must one day see in the wild) but at least my herper friends know what I’m talking about some of the time.

and this.

I almost always forget the common name, and further confuse people by using the short hand of binomial names… (ie Trach=Trachemys scripta=evil pest in the arboretum, Marm=Emys marmorata= awesome turtle in the arboretum, Crot=best snakes ever, Zonata= snake that I absolutely must one day see in the wild) but at least my herper friends know what I’m talking about some of the time.

This too!
Oddly doing museum prep or cataloging bird parts has no impact on my appetite. Unfortunately I also tend to talk about my work while eating, my parents and friends are used to it… but restaurant-goers aren’t, but luckily I catch myself before I start talking about details most of the time.

This too!

Oddly doing museum prep or cataloging bird parts has no impact on my appetite. Unfortunately I also tend to talk about my work while eating, my parents and friends are used to it… but restaurant-goers aren’t, but luckily I catch myself before I start talking about details most of the time.