I'm a herpetologist by training but a naturalist at heart. My masters thesis is looking into the Panamint alligator lizard, Elgaria panamintina. In particular I'm focusing on identifying its range and testing out a variety of novel techniques which may benefit the field of herpetology as a whole. I post things that interest me and often post updates on what I'm doing in the vertebrate museum, in the field, or in the lab.

 

Sonoran coral snake (Micruroides euryxanthus)
Found this guy in 2011 in an after-dark field herping session during a PARC conference.  Luckily these snakes don’t have large fangs as he ended up crawling over my shoe as everyone tried to scoop him into a bucket.  Everyone was in consensus that he was the highlight of the trip… even beating out the numerous gila monsters and rattlesnakes.

Sonoran coral snake (Micruroides euryxanthus)

Found this guy in 2011 in an after-dark field herping session during a PARC conference.  Luckily these snakes don’t have large fangs as he ended up crawling over my shoe as everyone tried to scoop him into a bucket.  Everyone was in consensus that he was the highlight of the trip… even beating out the numerous gila monsters and rattlesnakes.

The first wild rattlesnake I ever encountered- on a field trip with my herpetology class several years ago. Completely changed my perspective on the world and sent me into the field of herpetology.
Speckled Rattlesnake ( C. mitchellii)

The first wild rattlesnake I ever encountered- on a field trip with my herpetology class several years ago. Completely changed my perspective on the world and sent me into the field of herpetology.

Speckled Rattlesnake ( C. mitchellii)

In a remote forest fragment in Tanzania, scientists have made a remarkable discovery: a uniquely-colored horned viper extending over two feet long (643 millimeters) that evolved from its closest relative over two million years ago. Unfortunately, however, the new species—named Matilda’s horned viper (Atheris matildae)—survives in a small degraded habitat and is believed to be Critically Endangered. Given its scarcity, its discoverers are working to preempt an insidious threat to the new species.Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2011/1215-hance_matildasviper.html#ixzz1gevyIhDi

In a remote forest fragment in Tanzania, scientists have made a remarkable discovery: a uniquely-colored horned viper extending over two feet long (643 millimeters) that evolved from its closest relative over two million years ago. Unfortunately, however, the new species—named Matilda’s horned viper (Atheris matildae)—survives in a small degraded habitat and is believed to be Critically Endangered. Given its scarcity, its discoverers are working to preempt an insidious threat to the new species.


Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2011/1215-hance_matildasviper.html#ixzz1gevyIhDi

My lifer Crotalus atrox (Western Diamondback Rattlesnake) I have a few better pictures, but this’ll do for now. :) He was a feisty one… buzzing the whole time and coiled up as soon as he saw me- Tucson Arizona.

My lifer Crotalus atrox (Western Diamondback Rattlesnake) I have a few better pictures, but this’ll do for now. :) He was a feisty one… buzzing the whole time and coiled up as soon as he saw me- Tucson Arizona.

Cream may buy time for snake bite victims

Jun 27 (Reuters) - A chemical compound that is used on heart patients may raise chances of survival for snakebite victims, Australian scientists said on Monday.

 

In a paper published in Nature Medicine, the researchers said the chemical nitric oxide can slow down by as much as 50 percent the time it takes for snake venom to enter the bloodstream.

 

With that extra time, victims can seek medical help, said lead author Dirk van Helden, professor at the School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle in Australia

Pacific Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus amabilis) (by Crotalinae)
Normally I avoid “in-hand” shots of field herping, but I love how this one turned out.

Pacific Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus amabilis) (by Crotalinae)

Normally I avoid “in-hand” shots of field herping, but I love how this one turned out.

This scorpion decided to sting me when I tried to pick up a western skink that was next to it under a cover board. The sting was immediately intensely painful and resulted in a numb/tingly finger then hand then arm over the period of a few hours with shortness of breath and dizziness throughout. (6 hours later its still numb) One of the bug guys put it on top of the cover board so I could get a picture of it.
This reminded me to always account for all animals under a cover object before trying to pick up any- its better to not catch an animal than it is to be bit/stung by a venomous animal.
Does anyone know the species (Napa County, CA)?

This scorpion decided to sting me when I tried to pick up a western skink that was next to it under a cover board. The sting was immediately intensely painful and resulted in a numb/tingly finger then hand then arm over the period of a few hours with shortness of breath and dizziness throughout. (6 hours later its still numb) One of the bug guys put it on top of the cover board so I could get a picture of it.

This reminded me to always account for all animals under a cover object before trying to pick up any- its better to not catch an animal than it is to be bit/stung by a venomous animal.

Does anyone know the species (Napa County, CA)?

krotalossfit:

Self portrait.
Some people ask me, what the hell is Krotalos? I say:

Well….Krotalos is plural for  Crotalos in Spanish or Crotalus in Scientifi name! I just replaced the C with  the K since Crotalus comes from the Greek Krotalon which means “rattle.”
Crotalus  is the longest and most poisonous Serpent in North America that belongs  to the pitviper genera. Covered in overlapping scales and armed with  poisonous fangs, this baby is one killer snake. You might know this  serpent by a more common name. The rattlesnake. Several species are  known. 29 to be exact. They tend to retreat from humans but when  cornered, well, you guess what can happen.


Pretty snake… which is venomous, not poisonous

krotalossfit:

Self portrait.

Some people ask me, what the hell is Krotalos? I say:

Well….
Krotalos is plural for Crotalos in Spanish or Crotalus in Scientifi name! I just replaced the C with the K since Crotalus comes from the Greek Krotalon which means “rattle.”

Crotalus is the longest and most poisonous Serpent in North America that belongs to the pitviper genera. Covered in overlapping scales and armed with poisonous fangs, this baby is one killer snake. You might know this serpent by a more common name. The rattlesnake. Several species are known. 29 to be exact. They tend to retreat from humans but when cornered, well, you guess what can happen.

Pretty snake… which is venomous, not poisonous

herpetolove:

Gaboon Viper. Bitis gabonica.
Don’t keep one of these as a pet. :P

One day… I might just end up with one of these… maybe.

herpetolove:

Gaboon Viper. Bitis gabonica.

Don’t keep one of these as a pet. :P

One day… I might just end up with one of these… maybe.