I'm a herpetologist by training but a naturalist at heart. My masters thesis is looking into the Panamint alligator lizard, Elgaria panamintina. In particular I'm focusing on identifying its range and testing out a variety of novel techniques which may benefit the field of herpetology as a whole. I post things that interest me and often post updates on what I'm doing in the vertebrate museum, in the field, or in the lab.

 

vulture-adventures:

8/5/2014 - Ornithology Division

Just updating the database with all of our swallows. Here are some Bank Swallows (Raparia raparia) in order of age.

allcreatures:


A seagull lands on a sailor’s hat and takes a sip of his coffee. The sneaky bird perches on the head of Norwegian tour guide Ole Martin Dahle then dips its beak into his mug for a morning caffeine fix. The seagull was photographed by 55 year old professional photographer Andrew Astbury, whilst on a week-long trip in the county of Nord-Trondelag in Norway.

Picture: Andrew Astbury/HotSpot Media (via Pictures of the day: 27 August 2014 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

A seagull lands on a sailor’s hat and takes a sip of his coffee. The sneaky bird perches on the head of Norwegian tour guide Ole Martin Dahle then dips its beak into his mug for a morning caffeine fix. The seagull was photographed by 55 year old professional photographer Andrew Astbury, whilst on a week-long trip in the county of Nord-Trondelag in Norway.

Picture: Andrew Astbury/HotSpot Media (via Pictures of the day: 27 August 2014 - Telegraph)

Pelagic update:

I picked up a handful of new lifers- risso’s dolphin, elegant tern, common tern, black-vented shearwater, buller’s shearwater and frustratingly brief looks at a Manx shearwater. Photo lifers of all but Manx, and also a few other new photo lifers (Heermann’s gull & Brandt’s cormorant).

I also didn’t get even a little bit seasick- yay seasickness drugs!

Unfortunately, the guide/company I was with was lackluster at best, nice guys but absolutely horrible guides. Plus our car was stuck with a horrible travel companion who was super rude and annoying. She kept interrupting me anytime I tried to talk so I ended up sitting in silence most of the ride there and back.

HOWEVER.

I watched a giant Mola mola hunt and eat a couple of the thousands upon thousands of Velella velella we saw at sea.

If I just ignore the human component of the trip, the rest of it was actually pretty awesome, lots of cool critters.

 Photos soon.

scienceyoucanlove:





Ebola VirusThis is the most realistic rendering of Ebola virus. It takes Ebola virus only 12 days to get rid of its victim right after the appearance of the first symptoms. EV disease outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%. The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus.More about Ebola virus: http://goo.gl/y5pwwImage credit: Ivan Konstaninov, Visual Science, MoscowSource: http://goo.gl/gZvt2

 through Hashem AL-ghaili

scienceyoucanlove:

Ebola Virus

This is the most realistic rendering of Ebola virus. It takes Ebola virus only 12 days to get rid of its victim right after the appearance of the first symptoms. EV disease outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%. The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus.

More about Ebola virus: http://goo.gl/y5pww

Image credit: Ivan Konstaninov, Visual Science, Moscow
Source: http://goo.gl/gZvt2
 through Hashem AL-ghaili

markscherz:

You see the advantage of working in Madagascar is that none of the animals that you might not see are able to kill you.

In descending order:

South America: Fer-de-lance, Bothrops asper

Southern Asia: Russell’s Viper, Daboia russellii [x]

North America: Western Diamond Back Rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox [x]

Western Africa: Gaboon Viper, Bitis gabonica

Madagascar: Spear-nosed vine snake, Langaha madagascariensis [x]

Madagascar: Uroplatus sikorae - my photo.

(Madagascar has no dangerously venomous snakes - until very recently, it was thought that it didn’t have any venomous snakes at all, but venom has now been discovered in a number of endemic species, albeit pathetic venom that will, at worst, cause a temporary mild inflamation)

rhamphotheca:

At Paxon Rodent Services, our team of highly trained technicians will fully inspect and clean your capybara… FOR NO EXTRA COST!

rhamphotheca:

At Paxon Rodent Services, our team of highly trained technicians will fully inspect and clean your capybara… FOR NO EXTRA COST!

Today I got really good (and surprising) news!

I was referred for one of the law enforcement positions I applied for (meaning the veterans who applied had all been reviewed/rejected/turned down the position and non-veterans were therefore evaluated)… its the one I’d really want, so hopefully I’m the most qualified applicant! (it helps that I’ve job shadowed in that office, and its a GS-5 pathways position, so its limited to current masters/phd students).

Also, the store had tasty ginger snaps. This is the snack I’m convinced will keep seasickness away this weekend.

kqedscience:

San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?
“Tourists aren’t the only out-of-towners that flock to the city by the bay. Each year, more than 250 species of birds stop in San Francisco during their fall and spring migrations, said Judith Pynn of the Golden Gate Audubon Society. But birds passing through the big city on the Pacific Flyway can be thrown off by unfamiliar terrain, particularly windows.
They either don’t see the glass, or see a reflection and try to fly through it. “They may mistake it for a habitat [or] may see their own reflection and think it’s a rival and try to attack,” said Pynn, a resident of the Outer Sunset in San Francisco. She said a bird flew into a window in her home a few months ago. Pynn suspects that the window’s reflection of a nearby tree may have lured the bird to its death. “It’s a real hazard,” she said.”
Learn more at KQED Science.

kqedscience:

San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?

Tourists aren’t the only out-of-towners that flock to the city by the bay. Each year, more than 250 species of birds stop in San Francisco during their fall and spring migrations, said Judith Pynn of the Golden Gate Audubon Society. But birds passing through the big city on the Pacific Flyway can be thrown off by unfamiliar terrain, particularly windows.

They either don’t see the glass, or see a reflection and try to fly through it. “They may mistake it for a habitat [or] may see their own reflection and think it’s a rival and try to attack,” said Pynn, a resident of the Outer Sunset in San Francisco. She said a bird flew into a window in her home a few months ago. Pynn suspects that the window’s reflection of a nearby tree may have lured the bird to its death. “It’s a real hazard,” she said.”

Learn more at KQED Science.

lotsofbirds:

Ringed Kingfisher (Megaceryle torquata)
Distribution: South Texas to South America
IUCN Status: Least Concern
Learn more about this species:
Life history Information (via Inaturalist)
Songs and calls (via Xeno-Canto)
Recent observations (via ebird)
 (Photo by Tambako The Jaguar @ Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0)

lotsofbirds:

Ringed Kingfisher (Megaceryle torquata)

  • Distribution: South Texas to South America
  • IUCN Status: Least Concern

Learn more about this species:

 (Photo by Tambako The Jaguar @ Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0)

phoenixzoo:

Our crowned crane chick is currently sporting a pretty rad mohawk as he develops his adult feathers!

#PhoenixZoo #IGZoo #photooftheday #picoftheday #bird #birdsofinstagram #babyanimals #mohawk (at Phoenix Zoo)

phoenixzoo:

Our crowned crane chick is currently sporting a pretty rad mohawk as he develops his adult feathers!

#PhoenixZoo #IGZoo #photooftheday #picoftheday #bird #birdsofinstagram #babyanimals #mohawk (at Phoenix Zoo)

My bedroom is full of mosquitoes…

I don’t know why or how… but there have been at least twenty in the last hour. Luckily my dog is really good at catching them.

fastcompany:

Ka-Pow: Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams

Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.

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